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Sheridan Voysey

Sheridan Voysey

Sheridan Voysey is a writer, speaker, and broadcaster based in Oxford, England. Sheridan has authored several books including Resurrection Year: Turning Broken Dreams into New Beginnings, the award-winning Unseen Footprints: Encountering the Divine Along the Journey of Life, and the forthcoming title Resilient: Your Invitation to a Jesus-Shaped Life. He and his wife Merryn are featured in the Day of Discovery film A Journey Through Broken Dreams, and he has been featured in broadcast and print media across the US, UK, South Africa, and Australia. For many years Sheridan was the host of Open House, a live talk show heard around Australia every Sunday night, exploring life, faith, and culture. In nearly 20 years as a broadcaster Sheridan has interviewed some of the most prominent names in the Christian and mainstream world. Sheridan speaks regularly at conferences and events around the world. He holds degrees in theology and communication, and has served in numerous church and parachurch leadership roles. He is married to Merryn, devours books, loves Thai food, and is somewhat partial to dark chocolate. He blogs and podcasts at www.sheridanvoysey.com or find him on Facebook (facebook.com/sheridanvoysey) and Twitter (@sheridanvoysey).

Articles by Sheridan Voysey

What If?

In a recent email, a woman named Renee told me how she and her husband had unsuccessfully spent years trying to start a family. After numerous rounds of in vitro fertilization treatment and several years waiting to adopt, they were exhausted from the ordeal and considering bringing the journey to an end. Knowing that my wife and I had walked a similar path, Renee asked a question. “How do you give up on a dream of parenthood without regretting what might have been?”

Bigger Than You Imagine

God loves us. Most of us know this. But how many of us feel it? Paul knew that understanding God’s love was a difficult proposition. He believed supernatural revelation was required even to get started (Ephesians 3:16,18). God’s love is so large and our comprehension so small. How can we ever truly understand His love for us?

Homes And Other Treasures

Recently I decided to renovate the living room of our old terrace house. I painted the ceiling and replaced the ugly and dated lights. I took down the faded curtains and put up roller blinds. I spent hours on the walls—sanding off flaking paint, filling the many dents and holes, resanding, then applying multiple coats of new paint. A cement slab in the corner was removed and new tiles were laid. The fireplace also needed to be replaced. Finally, I sanded back the skirting boards and repainted them with gloss. It was hard work, but I felt proud of the changes I saw each day.

sift your dreams

The memory is vivid. My wife Merryn and I sat in emotional pain, talking. “If this really is our last chance to have a baby and it doesn’t happen,” Merryn said, “I need something else.” We’d spent the past decade trying everything to start a family—IVF treatment, healing prayer, adoption—all without success. We now awaited the result of one final IVF round. “If it doesn’t happen,” she said, her face downcast, “I have to have something else to look forward to.”

stirring, searching, humbling

Christmas cards and nativity scenes depict the wise men visiting the Christ-child. But I think the story is bigger than the way it’s presented. The wise men’s journey is also a paradigm for our spiritual journey.

your mission statement

Deep down, each of us longs to know what we’re here on earth to do—to have some sense of purpose and mission. Some people have a “life verse” from the Bible that gives them succinct focus. If you don’t have one of those, perhaps today’s passage is a good one to adopt.


After I finished speaking at a church one Sunday on how the cross shows that God can redeem our broken dreams and suffering, a guy came up to me wanting to talk. “I haven’t been to church in 26 years,” he said. “I’ve just been through a divorce and a business failure—I have lots of broken dreams. Just this week I said to a friend, ‘If there is a God, why doesn’t He step in to help?’ Then all week I had this feeling I should get to a church service. What you said tonight has really rocked me. It’s like I was meant to be here.”

the silence of Jesus

Silence. That’s all he gave them. Silence. And some strange scribbling in the sand.

father of lies

Paulo Coelho’s book The Pilgrimage recounts the story of Coelho walking the famous Camino pilgrimage route between France and Spain with a guide. I bought the book, but I wasn’t prepared for what I read.

dog whisperer

My young nieces recently introduced me to a favorite TV show of theirs: The Dog Whisperer. In the series, an animal behaviorist named Cesar Millan gives advice to pet owners who have unruly dogs. We soon became hooked on the show.

who sinned?

God has told me why your skin cancer hasn’t been healed,” the woman said to my friend. Really? he thought. Having suffered through two failed operations to remove the cancer from his face, my friend was desperate for a reason why. “God has told me it’s one of three things,” she continued. One of three? my friend thought. Even God doesn’t know for sure? “It’s either a generational curse passed down from your parents . . . ” It’s my parent’s fault? “Or it’s a secret sin in your life . . .” Which one? (My friend can be cheeky.) “Or you lack the faith to be healed.”

silencing the barren womb

Dear Sheridan,

in the café

Crystal stares out the café window, wondering if life will ever improve. Five men, two kids, all by age 29. She’s lonely and wonders if man no. 6 will make things better.

He knows you

He knows you. He knows every microcosm and nanosecond of your existence—every cell, atom, and molecule; every interest, weakness, and achievement; every hope, dream, and grief.

why didn’t He protect us?

Our lives began to fall apart when my daughter took her life,” the woman told me during a break in the conference we were both attending. “And then our second daughter spiraled into depression and started to ‘self-harm.’ After several months we discovered the reason why: While my husband and I were missionaries in Indonesia, two of our three children had been sexually abused at a mission-run school. We had given our lives to serve God. . . . Why didn’t He protect us?” I would hear similar stories at that conference—people who felt betrayed by God.