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Sheridan Voysey

Sheridan Voysey

Sheridan Voysey is a writer, speaker, and broadcaster based in Oxford, England. Sheridan has authored several books including Resurrection Year: Turning Broken Dreams into New Beginnings, the award-winning Unseen Footprints: Encountering the Divine Along the Journey of Life, and the forthcoming title Resilient: Your Invitation to a Jesus-Shaped Life. He and his wife Merryn are featured in the Day of Discovery film A Journey Through Broken Dreams, and he has been featured in broadcast and print media across the US, UK, South Africa, and Australia. For many years Sheridan was the host of Open House, a live talk show heard around Australia every Sunday night, exploring life, faith, and culture. In nearly 20 years as a broadcaster Sheridan has interviewed some of the most prominent names in the Christian and mainstream world. Sheridan speaks regularly at conferences and events around the world. He holds degrees in theology and communication, and has served in numerous church and parachurch leadership roles. He is married to Merryn, devours books, loves Thai food, and is somewhat partial to dark chocolate. He blogs and podcasts at www.sheridanvoysey.com or find him on Facebook (facebook.com/sheridanvoysey) and Twitter (@sheridanvoysey).

Articles by Sheridan Voysey

rescued from darkness

In Clint Eastwood’s movie Gran Torino, Walt Kowalski is a cranky Korean War vet disgusted by the gangs now running his neighborhood. He gets to know Thao, a teenager living next door, after catching him trying to steal his Gran Torino car—an act forced onto the young man by a local gang.

saving little ones

Jenny” grew up in a home where both parents engaged in extramarital affairs and were prone to violence. In this setting, Jenny soon became emotionally and physically neglected—and vulnerable to others.

Christian avoidance

In many parts of the world, it’s an amazing time to be a Christian. Most of us can walk down the street and find a church to join. If none interests us, we can go online and download our favorite preacher’s sermons in minutes. Hours and hours of biblical teaching for free. And Scripture! Most of us can read the Bible in our own language and in many different versions. We can buy it in softcover, red-letter, and slim-line formats. We can read it, listen to it, or watch it dramatized. Bible commentaries and devotional iPhone apps are ours for the downloading.

suffering with God

Pain. We take pills to ease it, hold prayer meetings to heal it, develop strategies to avoid it, and think up philosophies to explain it. We rarely, however, consider suffering as part of God’s plan for our lives.

pearls to pigs

I have always been perplexed by today’s reading in Matthew 7. What are these “pearls” being spoken of and who are the “pigs” we’re not to throw them to?

guard your heart

Christianity is a religion of the heart. Once God has our heart, the rest of life flows. To God, the heart is central.

serve your oppressor

A few years ago some young men stole my car. They crashed it, damaging it beyond repair, and I was never compensated for it. I even had to pay to have the car towed away from the crash site! By rights, those thieves should have replaced what they stole.

accepting correction

A theists are so limp-wristed because they have nothing to stand for! #ultimatecowards” “Atheists have no morality. They will hug a tree and murder a baby in its mother’s womb! #confused

my word is my promise

As an author, I’ve signed a few contracts. I’ve asked others to sign them too. What I dislike most about contracts is their endless clauses, spelled out in detailed legal jargon. It’s a litigious age. We’ve all heard of opportunistic folks, with well-paid lawyers, who find legal loopholes in such documents and cash in. So our contracts get longer and longer.

a king born for all

Scene one: A stable in Bethlehem, Judea. There, a group of shepherds kneel before a baby sleeping in a feeding trough (Luke 2:8-20). The society of the day despises these grimy, unclean shepherds, and they can’t believe they’re here. How could they have been given such a privilege?

narrow road, eternal life

One of the most prevalent of modern myths is the idea that boundary-less living leads to freedom. A permissive lifestyle may feel free for a time, but it will soon trap us. In ludicrous manner we shout, “I’m free! I’m free!” as we back into a cage and lock the door.

mary’s risky calling

May everything you have said about me come true” (Luke 1:38). With those words a young (probably teenage) Mary responded to the greatest discipleship call ever given. She had been chosen to give birth to the Son of God. The ramifications would be huge.

life . . . with God

Every month, more than 500,000 people Google “meaning of life.” Why am I here? They find answers ranging from “Life has no meaning” to “The meaning of life is whatever you make it.”

laws of love

Driving to work one day, I had a revelation. I realized that speed limits had been set to protect me and those around me, not to hamper my freedom or prove that I was a lawbreaker. If I sped and lost control of my car I could hurt myself, the lady driving toward me, or the man on the sidewalk. The traffic laws are in place because human life is valuable and should be protected.

right thing, wrong reason

I was preaching one evening when a mentally ill man walked down the church aisle, slapped me in the face, pushed over the pulpit, and sent the congregation into a panic. In a protective act, a church member named Gary stepped toward the man as he lunged towards Gary and his wife.