Headlines are typically marked by depressing, shocking, and salacious news. In an article with the tongue-in-cheek title of “Pastor Exposed as Faithful to Wife of 17 Years,” Megan Hill points out that, while lament is appropriate when faith leaders behave immorally, we must also remember to find encouragement in the many examples of faithful Christian leaders with healthy marriages. Such daily faithfulness is simply not seen as newsworthy.

The news cycle is also part of the reason why making “allowance for each other’s faults,” forgiving “anyone who offends” us, and clothing ourselves in love, as we’re called to do (Colossians 3:13-14), all appear miraculous in a dog-eat-dog world. Such behavior positively affects those around us, especially when we’re conditioned to expect the worst from others. While such behavior may not make the news, observers inside and outside of the church can’t help but take note when reconciliation occurs in relationships that were thought to be beyond repair, when enemies become friends.

Bearing with one another’s faults, forgiving offenses, making amends, and being intentional about loving others are all part of godliness (2 Peter 1:5-8). And when we act in godly ways, Jesus’ life in us pours over into the environment around us (Colossians 3:16).

When our life is one where we don’t see everyone with a critical eye, where we are intentional about reconciling with those who offend us, it will look like Jesus’ life, a life defined by love. Others may stop and contemplate whether such a life is possible for them too. And maybe they’ll even turn to God because of the good news He’s revealing through us (Colossians 3:17).

NLT 365-day reading plan passage for today: Luke 7:36–8:3