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Marvin Williams

Marvin Williams

Marvin was the Associate Pastor of Youth and Education at New Hope Baptist Church of Grand Rapids, Michigan from 1994–1999. He then served as an assistant preaching pastor at Calvary Church of Grand Rapids, Michigan (1999–2002)—filling the role of main communicator for the popular Saturday Night services. After that time, he became one of the leaders and pastors of Tabernacle Community Church in Grand Rapids. Today, he is Senior Teaching Pastor at Trinity Church in Lansing, Michigan. Marvin is adjunct faculty in the English Department at Grand Rapids Community College. He is also a regular writer for Our Daily Bread. He enjoys speaking regularly to college, high school, and middle school audiences. He has been a short-term missionary to Ghana, West Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, South Africa, and Moscow. Marvin, with his beautiful and smart wife, Tonia, and three children—Marvin Jr., Micah, and Mikayla—live near Lansing, Michigan.

Articles by Marvin Williams

Sin Always Hurts

Sin will always hurt. One couple found this to be true in a painfully embarrassing way. The two were arrested after they attempted to sell stolen goods at a pawnshop. The only problem with their plan was that the goods happened to be from the house of the pawnshop owner. The owner recognized the items, went home to find that his house had indeed been broken into, and reported the duo to the police—leading to their arrest.

United in Worship

Getting a group of people to move in the same way and at the same time requires skill. But over 31,000 women in China made it look easy. Guinness World Records says that 31,697 Chinese women set the record for mass plaza dancing in multiple locations. The participants danced for more than five minutes in six different cities.

Noticed

When people disobey the law, they make an effort to be inconspicuous. This wasn’t the case with a man accused of a hit-and-run accident while driving under the influence of alcohol. When an off-duty police officer stopped and approached the man’s car, he was met with an unusual surprise. “The man was covered . . . in gold spray paint.” Though the reason for the man’s glittery getup remains a mystery, I can’t help but wonder, Did he really think he could get away without anyone noticing him?

With Us in Our Suffering

Poet Christian Wiman, some time after being diagnosed with an incurable form of blood cancer, reflected on his ordeal, writing, “I have passed through pain I could never have imagined, pain that seemed to incinerate all my thoughts of God and to leave me sitting there in the ashes, alone.” But he found hope in the powerful presence of Jesus. “I am a Christian because of that moment on the cross when Jesus, drinking the very dregs of human bitterness, cries out, ‘My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?’ ” (Matthew 27:46). In times of great suffering, Wiman realized, only the One who carried all human suffering can sustain us.

No Unicorns and Rainbows

One day Dan McConchie was riding his motorcycle when a car unexpectedly came into his lane and forced him into oncoming traffic. When he woke up two weeks later in the trauma center, he was a mess. Along with a deflated lung and broken bones, he’d suffered a spinal-cord injury that left him a paraplegic. Dan prayed for healing, but it never came. Yet in the midst of this tragedy he experienced peace and learned a profound lesson: “Life isn’t for our comfort. Instead, the purpose of this life is that we become conformed to the image of Christ. Unfortunately, that doesn’t happen when everything is unicorns and rainbows. It instead happens when life is tough.”

A Joyful Finish

Brazilian runner Vanderlei de Lima went to Athens to compete in the Olympic marathon. On the last leg of the race, he was in first place. But suddenly a spectator bolted from the crowd and attacked de Lima. He didn’t injure the runner, but the assault lost him precious time and ultimately his hopes for a gold medal. Despite the unfortunate incident and ache in his heart, de Lima finished the race well, even winning the bronze medal. He crossed the finish line with joy—exhibiting a wide smile and dance moves.

Look for the Stars

Dr. Jamie Aten, a cancer survivor who researches how people respond to trauma, intimated that when going through adversity, perspective is everything. After Superstorm Sandy ravaged Seaside Heights, New Jersey (USA), one of Aten’s colleagues was deployed to help with relief efforts. She met a man whose roof had been blown away by the strong winds. Instead of wallowing in pessimism, the man gave some surprisingly optimistic advice: “Sometimes, you have to lose the roof to see the stars.” This man chose to see joyful meaning even in a great hardship.

The Waiting Game

A man from the Netherlands fell for a Chinese woman he met online. Impatient to meet her, he booked a flight and flew 5,000 miles for a visit. He’d sent her his itinerary, but when he arrived at the airport, she wasn’t there. The man, however, was so determined that he waited for her at the airport in China for ten days! Definitely a patient guy, though his faith in his love interest may have been misplaced.

God’s First Words

First words can be significant and transformative. The first words ever heard over a telephone were spoken by Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the new technology. On March 10, 1876, Bell called his assistant, Thomas Watson, and said: “Mr. Watson, come here.” On March 21, 2006, Jack Dorsey composed the very first words on Twitter, that “global water-cooler meeting place” of news and culture. It was a succinct message: “Just setting up my twttr.”

God’s Love Letter

Many years ago, a love-struck groom on a military base penned a love letter to his young bride. But then the letter was lost by the postal service. Forty-six years later, a crew dismantling an old post office discovered it. They turned it over to the postmaster who found the man and his wife and gave it to them days after their fiftieth wedding anniversary! The love expressed in the letter had endured the test of several decades.

Age Is Just a Number

Age shouldn’t stop anyone from making a big impact. It certainly didn’t stop ten-year-old Mikaila Ulmer. Instead of putting up a lemonade stand, Mikaila opened a lemonade business. Her company BeeSweet Lemonade started with her grandmother’s recipe and led to her pitching a business plan on the popular TV program Shark Tank. Mikaila was granted a $60,000 investment and has also signed a contract to sell her lemonade in fifty-five stores of a major grocery chain.

United in Worship

Getting a group of people to move in the same way and at the same time requires a lot of skill. But more than 31,000 dancers in China made it look easy. Guinness World Records says that 31,697 Chinese women set the record for mass plaza dancing in multiple locations. The participants danced for more than five minutes in six different cities.

Model It

It was a regular Monday evening at a senior care facility. Hamburgers were on the menu, and an 87-year-old named Patty was eating hers when she began to choke. But just in the nick of time, another resident came to the rescue and did the Heimlich maneuver on her—saving the day. That resident was none other than 96-year-old Dr. Henry Heimlich himself, the doctor who is widely credited with inventing the procedure. For Patty’s sake, it was a good thing that Dr. Heimlich actually modeled what he taught!

Always on Duty

Julie Stroyne, a trauma nurse, had just gotten married and immediately after the reception was walking with her wedding party in downtown Pittsburgh. Suddenly she spotted an unconscious woman on a bench. Still in her wedding dress, Stroyne kicked off her shoes and jumped into action in an effort to save the woman’s life. It didn’t matter that she was celebrating her wedding. As a nurse, she was ready to serve.

A Daring Savior

Sometimes you have to risk your life to save a life. That’s exactly what some pilots did when two workers at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station became ill. The only way to ensure their recovery was through a daring rescue mission. A spokesman stated that it was “the darkest and coldest of all past missions to the South Pole for medical evacuation.” Due to the harsh conditions, planes don’t usually go to the outpost between the months of February and October. But the pilots were undaunted. “The courage of the pilots to make the flight in extremely harsh conditions is incredible and inspiring,” said a fellow station worker.

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